Show Review: Hunter and the Bear

Hunter and the Bear

This week I had the privilege of attending the latest Communion Music Residency show at Rockwood Music Hall, NYC, with its eclectic range of artists, including Hunter and the Bear. It was the first American show for the UK natives, who originally hail from England and Scotland but have made London their musical home.

Hunter and the Bear took on Stage One with a great crowd, especially considering the small space. Both the band and fans brought an excited energy so it was easy to dive right in.

Opening with “Burn It Up,” singer Will came out with a surprisingly grisly sound that was clear and captivating. Guitars and drums melded together and I knew we were off to a good start.Without missing a beat, Will moved right into the next song, “Hanging By A Thread.” This definitely had a harder rock feel that required no introduction. The Hunter and the Bear sound, I have to admit, surprised me coming from a UK band. They are definitely no 1975 or even Coldplay–not that that’s a bad thing.

There’s a genuine rock feel that seems to fit couched in Americana. The best example from “Hanging By A Thread” is a strong reminder of Jace Everett’s “Bad Things” (the True Blood theme song), which I find incredibly unique. It was impressive to hear the similar vibrations from Hunter and the Bear radiating so successfully.

What’s also evident about this band is how clearly they have fun. Throughout the set they were feeding off each other in ways that enhanced their performance and propelled the energy of the crowd.

The next song of note was “Montana Men,” where Will took a moment to open up to the crowd. He explained the band’s origins, in particular their connection to a story from the Highlands of Scotland. About farmers with practically nothing heading out to find new land in America, the story inspired not only the song but the band itself. And talking with Will after the show, what would be better than to get these guys out West, singing “Montana Men” in Montana!

As you might guess, the song has a much more folk sound, with a more mellow tone. I enjoyed how it showcased the band and where they come from–their motto of sorts.

Next we were introduced to a new song that the band had never played live. Called “Hey My Love,” the track opens with a tremendous rumble of the cymbals from drummer, Gareth. It was just one example of how masterful Hunter and the Bear is with their beats. They had a fantastic underlay, not just on this song but throughout the set. “Hey My Love” was also a different song in the emotions behind it, plunging a little deeper in that realm.

It was a great introduction to the States for Hunter and the Bear. They’ll be playing a few CMJ shows coming up, including another show at Rockwood on Friday, October 16, so definitely check them out!

This week I had the privilege of attending the latest Communion Music Residency show at Rockwood Music Hall, NYC, with its eclectic range of artists, including Hunter and the Bear. It was the first American show for the UK natives, who originally hail from England and Scotland but have made London their musical home.

Hunter and the Bear took on Stage One with a great crowd, especially considering the small space. Both the band and fans brought an excited energy so it was easy to dive right in.

Opening with “Burn It Up,” singer Will came out with a surprisingly grisly sound that was clear and captivating. Guitars and drums melded together and I knew we were off to a good start.Without missing a beat, Will moved right into the next song, “Hanging By A Thread.” This definitely had a harder rock feel that required no introduction. The Hunter and the Bear sound, I have to admit, surprised me coming from a UK band. They are definitely no 1975 or even Coldplay–not that that’s a bad thing.

There’s a genuine rock feel that seems to fit couched in Americana. The best example from “Hanging By A Thread” is a strong reminder of Jace Everett’s “Bad Things” (the True Blood theme song), which I find incredibly unique. It was impressive to hear the similar vibrations from Hunter and the Bear radiating so successfully.

What’s also evident about this band is how clearly they have fun. Throughout the set they were feeding off each other in ways that enhanced their performance and propelled the energy of the crowd.

The next song of note was “Montana Men,” where Will took a moment to open up to the crowd. He explained the band’s origins, in particular their connection to a story from the Highlands of Scotland. About farmers with practically nothing heading out to find new land in America, the story inspired not only the song but the band itself. And talking with Will after the show, what would be better than to get these guys out West, singing “Montana Men” in Montana!

As you might guess, the song has a much more folk sound, with a more mellow tone. I enjoyed how it showcased the band and where they come from–their motto of sorts.

Next we were introduced to a new song that the band had never played live. Called “Hey My Love,” the track opens with a tremendous rumble of the cymbals from drummer, Gareth. It was just one example of how masterful Hunter and the Bear is with their beats. They had a fantastic underlay, not just on this song but throughout the set. “Hey My Love” was also a different song in the emotions behind it, plunging a little deeper in that realm.

It was a great introduction to the States for Hunter and the Bear. They’ll be playing a few CMJ shows coming up, including another show at Rockwood on Friday, October 16, so definitely check them out!

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